Tag Archives: skin care

Aquafina Advanced Hydration Wrinkle Release & Sealer Skincare: Review

When I first caught glimpse of the Aquafina logo staring back at me down the beauty section isle, I was wondering if I got lost, was I down the wrong isle?

I immediately associated the name Aquafina with bottled water. I was not expecting to see the logo in the beauty section at all.

Due to the fact that Aquafina seemed to of gotten lost in the beauty section, I was of course intrigued. What the heck is Aquafina doing down here?

I then began to think of Aquafina, and how it’s logo is usually on bottled water… I wondered, would this Aquafina stuff be like hydration for my skin, like a drink for my thirsty dry skin? Perhaps.

I went for Aquafina Advances Hydration, Wrinkle Release amp; Sealer. I turned the adorable box around and read the details. I was shocked at the bold promise of visible results in just one hour! Now in my years of buying products with bold promises such as this, it usually meant one thing. Rip-Off!

Results in one hours time! Yeah, okay… whattyah take me for, an idiot? Nothing works in just an hour. Not even Lipo.

Guess I’m an idiot, because I walked out $5.00 poorer. I guess though it’s not such a bad thing. Usually this stuff sells for $14.00 elsewhere. Walmart had a $5.00 special clearance section… and Aquafina Advanced Hydration Wrinkle Release amp; Sealer happened to be in the clearance section. Seeing how Aquafina Advanced Hydration Wrinkle Release amp; Sealer is also new to the market… it most likely meant bad things.

Usually if a product lands a spot in the clearance rack so quickly, it most likely means it sucks. But I am… the worlds largest sucker… so I bought it up anyway.

The Packaging:

Aquafina Advanced Hydration Wrinkle Release amp; Sealer packaging screams bottled water… only it’s in a cardboard rectangular packaging, with a small hallowed window where a little bottle of lotion in a jug sits.

The package itself is a metallic colored blue, which is really pretty, and eye catching. It also has Aquafina’s signature logo at the top.

The Promise:

Besides the very bold ‘one hour results’ promise. Aquafina Advanced Hydration Wrinkle Release amp; Sealer also promises to reduce the appearance of wrinkles, and the texture of skin. Using Aquafina Advanced Hydration Wrinkle Release amp; Sealer also will supposedly help reduce puffiness. Did I mention… in just an hour?

Yeah, yeah, all this, in an hour.

My Use:

I unscrewed the lotions lid, and began applying the lotion to my face. I noticed that it had no scent, which was sort of disappointing. I have always enjoyed a nice scent to go with my facial lotions. Aquafina Advanced Hydration Wrinkle Release amp; Sealer though, had none.

The lotion has a decent texture, and I especially liked how it didn’t leave behind any sort of nasty greasy residue. It absorbed quickly, and all was well.

I was actually counting the minutes while using this one. I couldn’t wait to see if there were results in an hour. I watched an episode of Maury, and found out ‘he was NOT the father’. I then checked my face.

Results:

Err… everything pretty much looked the same. However because I was ‘expecting’ results, I began to imagine I saw results. I couldn’t go by the first test. I was too excited about it working. I had to wait again and test it the next day to see if the one hour results were legit.

Day 2, and I could tell my skin was the same. One hour before I put it on, and one hour after putting it on.

Of course I had been taken…

Where To Find:

I have only spotted Aquafina Advanced Hydration Wrinkle Release amp; Sealer at Walmart so far. I am sure though this stuff is being sold in drug stores as well. I recommend you purchase something else though.

Overall:

Aquafina needs to stick to bottling water.

Using Calendula in Skincare and First Aid

Since the dawn of time mankind has relied on the bounty of nature for medicine. Calendula officinallis, also called Pot Marigold or English Marigold, has one of the longest recorded histories of use of all herbs. Calendula has been used speed the healing of cuts, scrapes, and burns and to soothe skin irritation. Herbalists use the whole, ground flower applied directly to the skin or as tinctures and oils. Homeopathically prepared Calendula it is used in the same way and also taken internally to speed healing of internal and oral injuries. The flower may also be brewed as a tea.

The genus includes roughly 12-20 different species of annual or perennials in the daisy family Asteraceae. They are native to the Mediterranean area and should not be confused with other plants also called marigolds. Calendula officinallis is, however, easy for the home gardener to cultivate in nearly any climate.

Calendula is available in many different preparations from homeopathic pills to herbal creams to diaper rash cream and even toothpaste. It is also a popular ingredient in moisturizers, soaps, and bath products and is a useful ingredient in lip balms and diaper rash cream for its skin-soothing properties.

-Calendula is aseptic, it does not kill bacteria, but it does have properties to prevent their growth.

-Calendula is generally considered to be non-toxic for internal use.

-The herb is most commonly used to aid healing of a wound and to prevent the infection of severe wounds on the body.

-Calendula products are readily available in stores.

-The flower petals are edible and can be used decoratively in salads or pastries.

-Applied topically, it can help stem the bleeding from minor cuts and scrapes.

-Calendula cream can be used in tandem with topical antibiotic ointments.

-As with any herbal medicine, ask your doctor before consuming Calendula preparations if you are on any prescription medication.

Some excellent uses for the herb:
Minor cuts and scrapes
Windburn
Scratches
Paper cuts
Hangnails or painful skin under a torn nail
Injured or bleeding gums after dental work
Minor burns and sunburn
Perineal healing following childbirth
Sore nipples from breastfeeding
Skinned knees
Rashes
Wound healing after surgery(especially for itchy stitches)
Acne sores
Bug Bites
Tattoo healing
Persistent scabs
Sore noses from colds, flu, or allergies
Pain following hair removal
Abrasions
Chaffed skin
Diaper rash
Chapped Lips

Acne, Wrinkles, Dry Problem Skin: The Ultimate Secret to Clear, Soft, Young, Baby-Like Skin

In the world of thousands of different anti-aging products that claim to reverse the signs of aging, it can be confusing to know which anti-aging wrinkle cream or supplement is telling the truth! However, research shows that topically applied anti-aging creams or supplements have not been scientifically tested to work. The only exception is Retin-A; the downside is this comes with side-effects such as acne breakouts, irritated and dry skin. It is also very costly.

The good news is that it’s never too early (or late) to start protecting your skin for the glorious years to come. Believe it or not, sunscreen isn’t what maintains a youthful look. With the many synthetic chemicals placed in commercial sunscreens, they can actually be a hindrance to having healthy, radiant skin. This applies to other anti-aging creams as well. Research shows that oils that have been overly heated and processed (specifically oils with mostly omega-6 fatty acids) are found in many skincare products and can actually contribute to accelerate aging the skin! One of the main reasons is because free radicals are produced when oils are heated.

You may have heard that eating healthy and exercising are the two best ways to keep yourself looking young. This is true to an extent, but even if you exercise regularly, eat mostly organic produce, and perform a fantastic skincare everyday, there is a missing element that is little-known that contributes to healthy skin. It is often overlooked and not discussed enough, in comparison to the advice of wearing sun block everyday. So what is the missing element?

Water! It’s not just drinking 8-10 glasses a day that is important. The secret is the pH of the type of water you consume that makes the difference between having smooth, clear, young, and radiant skin—or dull, heavy lined and wrinkled, and acne-infested skin. Did you know that tap and bottled water were tested to be too acidic for the body? Even if you eat all organic produce, but wash the produce in your tap water, you are negating the healthy effect.

Excess acid in the body contributes to a whole load of problems such as:
Premature aging of the skin (Wrinkles) Acne Unexplained skin rashes Psoriasis And many more health and skin related problems The simple solution is to drink water that is closer to an alkaline pH; A suggestion is to invest in a filter for your tap water.

Skincare: Tips and Tricks Towards Healthy Skin

Most of us know that caring for our skin is the sure-fire way to ensure we maintain its resilience and glow, but many of us fail to realize how easily caring for it can be. A few years ago, high maintenance care for hair and make-up were acceptable; today, most of us find our schedules have grown and priorities have changed – so the prospect of ordering our schedule to include adequate skincare seems impossible. At the same time, many products have improved (and sometimes cause us delays when we ponder the best investments). Quite simply, now more than ever the available products can help us minimize and make effective what little time we have to spend on skin. To get the best results, consider what you need to do and plan for it.

Many people give up in disgust as they consider what they think they need and how much it may require to shop for it and use it: cleanser, toner, moisturizer, masks, special serums, exfoliants, sun protection, foundation … The list seems endless. To complicate things further, labeling and ‘hot new ingredients’ can be perplexing; we hear that green tea is excellent but find it’s not in a trusted product, whereas peppermint is. Rather than find the possibilities daunting, it’s wise to consider one’s needs – and potential products as solutions – to maximize a simplified routine.

There are ‘stand-by products’ which are needed for routine care: cleanser, toner, and moisturizer. None of these are wise to leave off the list; however, careful choices for these products may make the rest of your list smaller.

Each morning and each night:

* Most of us need to clean our skin to refresh it; a gentle cleanser is typically the most versatile, whether for combination skin, dehydrated skin, or sensitive skin. Heed aging as a prompt for gentleness – especially with cleansers.

* A toner (sometimes called an astringent) should follow. The point is to remove residue from cleansers and ‘refresh’ the acid mantle of skin. This product needs to work with your skin type; typically, erring on the side of mild is best because even blemish-prone skin will have ill effects from too drying a toner (in fact, dryness may stimulate more oil production, defeating the purpose of a strong toner).
When choosing a toner, look for something with antibacterial properties. On the ‘high end’ are products which include natural purifiers and toning agents (which soothe the skin once purified so that pores close); peppermint oil is a good example. If one is out of toner or on a budget, ‘low end’ products to be used as toners may include hydrogen peroxide (3% strength, perhaps in your first aid cabinet) with its antiseptic qualities (and mild bleaching properties – careful not to get this in the hairline too often!), witch hazel, and water-diluted lemon juice (can be drying and bleaching also).

* Finish the routine with a moisturizer suited to your needs. This may be an easy find or a difficult one; formulations here can run the gamut just like formulations for hair conditioner. Products to provide deeply penetrating hydration may sit alongside items intended to offer light protection from the wind. Important: look for products which maximize your goals. If, for example, you want something which will not add to excess oil or any blockages in the skin (in the case of someone with blackheads or whiteheads), get a “non-comedogenic” and “oil-free” formula (these have been tested and provided so as to avoid irritants which typically lead to breakouts). If, though, you’re interested in deep hydration, look for shea butter or glycerin (for example, glycerin helps skin draw moisture).

Depending on other skin regimen tools and strategies (mostly this depends on your level of concern for your skin’s condition), moisturizers can be tools to work in concert with (or instead of) other products. Some antioxidants and some AHAs may be effective in moisturizers; research is providing more insights routinely. And please, realize that a versatile moisturizer should be effective for all of your face; no special serums are likely to be necessary.

Aside from the mainstays, what do you need – or what can you avoid? Sun screen, for example, should not be avoided, but it may be possible to find a moisturizer with it. Likewise, another way to eliminate the cost and time of buying another product is to look for a moisturizer with a tint – and avoid a separate foundation product. Or if your moisturizer of choice doesn’t have sunscreen, get a foundation with sunscreen. The missing item at this point is a specialty cleanser for more occasional ‘deep cleaning.’ If your skin is not overly sensitive or dry, you may eliminate a separate ‘mask’ product by getting cleansing cloths with exfoliating textures or ingredients. And that, quite frankly, prepares your skin to get beyond daily grime and back to its natural beauty – with a minimal number of products.

Pregnancy Skincare Guide: Acne, Stretch Marks, Rashes & Pregnancy Mask

Feeling cheated out of the touted beatifically glowing expectant mother skin? You’re not alone, pregnancy hormones can wreck havoc on the skin. Many women experience pregnancy related skin problems, such as acne, pregnancy mask, rashes and the dreaded stretch marks. Learn how to prevent and combat these common pregnancy skin care nightmares.

Prevent amp; Treat Pregnancy Acne

Help diminish and prevent pregnancy acne by using topical products that have alpha hydroxy or glycolic acid, or sulphur-based. Glytone has a flesh tinted acne treatment lotion, with glycolic acis as the main ingredient. It retails for $18.

Microdermabrasion treats are also available, that can be done in the relative comfort of your own bathroom. For more severe outbreaks, prescription strength topical medications are available. They included erythromycin cream and azelaic acid. Oral erythromycin can also be prescribed by a doctor. According to WebMD, these prescription acne medications are safe to use during pregnancy, but your doctor will be the best judge of what is right for your health, during your pregnancy.

Over-the-counter acne medications can help with acne caused by pregnancy, but their are ingredients that are unsafe for expecting mothers. Acne medication ingredients to avoid, while pregnant, are benzol peroxide, salicylic acid and any retinoids.

The hormones of pregnancy can cause changes in your skin tone, so you may need to switch what type of makeup you buy. If your skin is oily try a foundation specifically for that, a mattifying product or a loose mineral powder. They are designed to absorb oil, without causing acne. Keep blotting papers handy, so you can use them throughout the day to combat oily skin.

Pregnancy Stretch Marks

Stretch marks are the blight of what should be one of the most joyous experiences. According to WebMD, most doctors now believe that stretch marks are hereditary and most creams won’t prevent them. The best ones to try contain soothing green tea or glycolic acid. The good news is that there are many laser procedures that will fade stretch marks, after you are no longer pregnant.

Stop amp; Sooth Rashes

Hormones and stretching skin during pregnancy combine to make skin itch or erupt into a rash. This can be soothed by several home remedies, such as soaking in a warm bath that you’ve added a cup of oatmeal to. Soaking a clean washcloth in warm milk, then laying it over the rashy skin can also give you relief.

Over-the-counter pregnancy rash combatants include calamine lotion and moisturizers. If the itch becomes too crazy to stand, your doctor may prescribe you steroid creams. Be sure to report any itchiness and rashes, especially those with blisters, to your doctor. These can be signs of autoimmune reactions or a liver condition, both of which can potentially cause premature birth.

Dealing with ‘Pregnancy Mask’

‘Pregnancy mask’ – more accurately called melasma or chloasma, is when dark patches of skin occur on the face. Pregnancy mask occurs when pregnancy hormones are exposed to sunlight. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, women with dark hair and complexions are more likely to develop pregnancy mask.

The best way to lessen the possible severity of pregnancy mask is to stay out of the sun. You can also wear sunscreen and clothing with SPF protection. Topical products to help with skin pigmentation can include azelic acid or vitamin C.

If you choose to cover up pregnancy mask with makeup, moisturize first. Go with thicker, less sheer versions of concealer and foundation. Choose the shade closest to your natural complexion, to avoid a cakey or pasty look. Lighter shades will also draw attention to the very spots you are trying to hide.

Source:

http://www.dermstore.com/product_Flesh+Tinted+Acne+Treatment+Lotion_2812.htm

http://www.webmd.com/baby/features/pregnancy-skin-care-get-that-glow

http://www.aad.org/education/students/Melanocytes.htm